things

(Source: giuliettaw)

(Source: filthe)

rita-haxx:

malformalady:

Candles featuring the artwork of Stephen Gammell, popular as the illustrations from  Alvin Schwartz’s Scar Stories to Tell in the Dark series.
Buy them(for me) at BadMoonShop

I need these

rita-haxx:

malformalady:

Candles featuring the artwork of Stephen Gammell, popular as the illustrations from  Alvin Schwartz’s Scar Stories to Tell in the Dark series.

Buy them(for me) at BadMoonShop

I need these

(Source: thievinggenius)

(Source: filthavenue)

Life is nothing until it is lived; but it is yours to make sense of, and the value of it is nothing else but the sense that you choose.

—Jean-Paul Sartre, Existentialism is a Humanism (via mike-faust)

(Source: tiredtangerine)

(Source: metaf)

(Source: televandalist)

talisman:

Stephen Fry, Moab Is My Washpot

talisman:

Stephen Fry, Moab Is My Washpot

(Source: aseaofquotes)

Symbolism exists to adorn and enrich, not to create an artificial sense of profundity.

—Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft (via maxkirin)

kambriel:

austinkleon:

Edward Gorey’s covers for Doubleday Anchor Paperbacks

From goreyography.com:

In April 1953, Anchor opened up a new market for paperbacks: the “serious” or academic book. They were the brainchild of twenty-five year old Jason Epstein who convinced Doubleday of the market need for such books in paper editions particularly suited for college use. Epstein’s research so impressed the Doubleday executives that they created such a line and made him editor. The format was the same as the taller mass market size (Signet, Ballantine, etc.), but higher in price: 65¢ to $1.45. Anchor was well received from the start, reaching a mass audience through trade book outlets, campus bookstores and some drugstores. And they had Edward Gorey in charge of the covers.

As art editor, Gorey was responsible for the total cover package, supplying the lettering, typography and design layouts. Often other artist contributed the actual illustration: Leonard Baskin, Milton Glaser, Philippe Julian and even Andy Warhol; but Gorey then designed the finished product lending a uniform appearance to the whole line.

Gorey worked in this capacity from 1953 until 1960, a period which roughly corresponds with Anchor’s first two hundred titles. About a fourth of these have line drawn covers by Gorey. He also designed various covers for Vintage, Capricorn, Compass and other publications that followed Anchor’s lead.

Browse a wonderful set of these covers on Flickr→

Filed under: Edward Gorey

A wealth of illustrated book covers from beloved “Uncle Eddie”.